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becoming a marijuana grower

Becoming a marijuana grower

Costs of electricity is the number one expense facing producers and often matches or exceeds total lease costs per month during production.

Already considered a success in achieving water-saving status in the UK brewing industry, some cannabis producers are investing in closed-circuit desalination (CCD), reverse osmosis water systems. At the same time as purifying incoming municipal water sources, these CCD systems can recover as much as 97% of wastewater, therefore reducing water demand and saving in disposal fees.

Commercial Greenhouse Structures

Solar energy is becoming increasingly affordable – especially at larger and more significant scales. Colorado, presumably spurred by the initial successes and yet substantial energy costs of its early recreational cannabis industry, more than tripled its renewable energy since 2010, now generating more than 30 percent of its electricity from reusable and renewable sources as of 2020.

The most important consideration in evaluating a potential grow space is ensuring proper ventilation for your crops. Cannabis plants require a lot of light, which typically emit a tremendous amount of heat. Without proper ventilation and air exchange, producers risk cooking their crop or limiting yields due to excess humidity, heat, or oxygen. Greenhouse-specific HVAC systems exist for closed greenhouse schemes and help producers program hyper-accurate climate control systems to ensure the facility maintains ideal growth conditions.

Indoor Growing Facilities

There are already private projects invested in researching the most affordable methods of growing and distributing recreational cannabis in the U.S. An effort to evaluate the cannabis industry’s LED lighting requirements and help improve efficiency estimates the best and most valuable techniques for optimization are not yet public – thanks largely to the “behind closed doors” nature of the industry from a historical perspective. But early reports from first-generation growers in Colorado and Washington suggest that those invested in sustainable energy solutions benefited most from sales in the first fiscal year of legalization, whereas those growing in indoor warehouses made up about one-third of the industry’s first year of legal energy consumption.

Becoming a marijuana grower

Last but not least, make it a point to express that work is your top priority. In many cases, cannabis growers are akin to medical professionals in the sense that they are on call. If you make it clear that you are committed to your profession and that you are someone others can undoubtedly rely on, your interview will be more likely to yield favorable results!

There are certain qualifications that dispensary owners look for when seeking out the right grower for their business. It’s not uncommon for an interview to contain questions regarding your prior schooling.

From the horticultural element to the art of crossbreeding plants and everything in between, the owners of a dispensary are going to be looking for growers who clearly understand their profession like the back of their hand. It’s admirable to meet with growers who not only know what they’re talking about, but who recognize that there is still a lot to learn in an ever-evolving industry.

Have an Understanding of Cannabis-Related Horticulture

If you are new to the cannabis industry, you may want to think about viewing your dream of being a grower as a long-term goal. There’s no rush at all, and if you don’t feel that you are ready to dive headfirst into the lifestyle of a marijuana grower, it’s perfectly okay to start out in a simpler position within the industry.

Whether it’s something you are doing by choice or a move you have to make to get where you want to be in the long run, it doesn’t hurt to consider starting out in a more entry-level position. This is especially true if you have little to no experience handling cannabis in the first place!

…But elaborate on your talents and abilities! The goal is to come across as humble as possible without diminishing your intellect and skillset.
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Apply for a Cultivation License

In order to grow cannabis, you need to have a permit. Known as a marijuana grower’s license, this documentation is proof that you are qualified to not only grow cannabis, but to supply a dispensary with the marijuana plants you’re growing. The specifics of this step will differ depending on where you live, so look into your state-level regulations regarding the marijuana grower’s licensing process.

No matter what your path to becoming a grower for a dispensary looks like, you’ll get to where you want to be someday. As long as you stay committed and devote yourself to your trade, your dreams of becoming a grower will manifest soon.

Becoming a marijuana grower

Once your business is licensed and set up, it’s time to prepare for opening. You’ll need to stock your inventory, building your vendor and supplier relationships, hire and train employees, and start promoting your business.

Passion for the industry and experience growing at home are not enough to start a successful marijuana grow operation. You need a team of experienced experts, local support from your community, strong financial models, and more.

In order to run your cultivation site, you need to prepare in advance by setting up lighting and other environmental equipment, installing security, purchasing equipment and supplies, selecting a payment processor, setting up compliance processes, and more.

READY TO START YOUR GROW BUSINESS?
⇨ CLICK HERE TO GET CERTIFIED IN CANNABIS CULTIVATION

If you want to become a grower in the legal cannabis industry but don’t want to own a grow facility, there are many types of grower jobs to choose from. Salaries typically range from $12 per hour for entry-level trimmers to $150,000 or more for master growers who have cannabis experience and PhDs.

A master grower typically holds a master’s degree or PhD in horticulture, botany, or a physical science and is responsible for genetics, designing grow systems, maximizing harvests, managing the grow facility, and managing and training the grow team of workers. This is not a job for home growers. Master growers are responsible for large commercial grow sites and must be able to scale those grow sites even more if the opportunity arises.

You need to create process requirements for breeding, cloning, trimming, drying, curing, packaging, distribution, and much more.

1. Planning

It’s an extremely competitive process, and you only get one chance to get it right. Invest wisely.

Trimmers are usually hourly employees who are responsible for cutting marijuana plants by hand during harvests. A college degree is usually not required, which makes it a great way for people who are interested in cannabis growing to break into the industry.