Posted on

can u use miracle grow on weed plants

Can u use miracle grow on weed plants

Today, Hagedorn and company—including his son Chris, who runs Hawthorne Gardening—sound like they want to take the business well beyond hardware-store hobbyists, and into the age of Big Weed. On the call, Hagedorn noted that the next legal markets are likely to have “fewer growers but larger ones.”

Hagedorn has been betting big on weed since 2013. That’s when, according to a colorful 2016 profile in Forbes, Hagedorn wandered into a Washington state garden store, where a shopkeeper told him that “everyone called him an idiot when he first started selling hydroponics equipment, but the stuff was flying off the shelves, with an average receipt of $400—straight cash.”

Scotts Miracle-Gro, the maker of home, lawn, and garden-care goods that traces its roots back to the 19th century, blamed disappointing quarterly earnings on the volatility of the cannabis market, on which it is increasingly dependent.

“I told everyone ‘We’re doing it,’” Hagedorn said to Forbes. “‘If you don’t like it, leave. We’re doing it. It’s beyond stopping. And we’re not getting into pot growing. We’re talking dirt, fertilizer, pesticides, growing systems, lights. You know it’s a multibillion-dollar business, and we’ve got no growth in our core. Are you guys stupid?’”

Since 2016, annual sales growth at subsidiary Hawthorne Gardening—which owns dozens of brands selling lights, filtration systems, premium soil, containers, air filters, and more specialized supplies for hydroponic operations—has outpaced the group’s general lawn and garden business. For the fourth quarter, the parent company reported overall sales of $298 million, up 35% from the same quarter a year before. The Hawthorne unit was up a whopping 84% over that period, largely thanks to its acquisition of Sunlight Supply, yet another name in hydroponics that represented a near-literal doubling down in the weed business for Scotts Miracle-Gro.

When one analyst implied that Scotts’ general consumer business hadn’t served large-scale professional landscapers as well as it had individual consumers in the past, Hagedorn (who is notably sharp-tongued) bristled.

“Dude, I have a ton of respect for you,” he said. “But I think that’s total bullshit.”

Can u use miracle grow on weed plants

Avoid Miracle-Gro Soil for Growing Weed!

Important: Do not use “Miracle Gro” soil or any soil that has “extended release” nutrients. These types of soil will continue to release nitrogen to your plant roots for up to 6 months. This can burn your cannabis plants in the flowering/budding stage and reduce your overall yields.

Do not use “Miracle-Gro” soil or any soil that has “extended release” nutrients for growing cannabis. These types of soil will continue to release nitrogen to your plant roots for up to 6 months. This can cause deficiencies or burn your cannabis plants in the flowering/budding stage, reducing your overall yields. I have seen growers successively grow cannabis in Miracle Gro, but many of them struggled with nutrient problems in the flowering stage (like the following) even though plants were healthy throughout the vegetative stage.

What’s worse than the standard Miracle-Gro nutrients is the original Miracle-Gro soil. Standard Miracle-Gro soil has “time-released” nutrients which contain high levels of nitrogen. While this formula will work okay in the cannabis vegetative stage (the first stage of life), the nutrients will continue to be slowly released throughout the plant’s life including during the cannabis flowering stage, which is not good.

There’s nothing inherently wrong with Miracle-Gro nutrients, and if you’re willing to learn about nutrients, you can use the various different formulas and get a cannabis plant to grow. For example if you’re using regular soil, you could use the standard Miracle-Gro formula for vegetative, and their “bloom” version for the cannabis flowering stage.

In my experiences using MiracleGro, I’ve mixed 1 tablespoon/gallon of the of the crystal-like fertilizer with water. I’ve used that for years now for weed plants and in my veggie garden. Thats full strength. Feed it every 2 weeks throughout vegging and switch to whatever you want for flowering.

Your first feeding should be 1/2 strength, don’t feed it too early, etc, etc.

And I kinda think that many people on the forum have no problems with MG fertilizer and actually it is used quite a bit.
On the other hand, MG soil isn’t recommended for new growers because it comes with slow release nutes in it.. which usually means that the over-ambitious noobs burn the plants because they’ve had no experience dealing with this problem before.