Posted on

capers seeds

Capers seeds

Caper seeds are very tiny and germinate readily but in low percentiles. Dried seeds are more difficult to germinate and should be soaked for one day in warm water, then wrapped in damp towel, sealed in a jar and refrigerated for two to three months. Post refrigeration, re-soak seeds overnight and then plant at a depth of 0.5 inches (1 cm.) in a well drained medium.

A caper bush also has medicinal uses. Growing capers may be harvested to aid in eliminating flatulence, improving liver function, or for its anti-rheumatic effects. An age-old remedy, growing capers have also been reputed to be useful in treating arteriosclerosis, kidney ailments, diuretics, anemia, arthritis, gout, and dropsy.

Growing a caper bush can be achieved via propagation from seed, although finding a seed source is more of a challenge. If seed for growing capers is located, one may try growing them in a large pot with a base of coarse rock or crumbled brick. Take care not to overwater as the plant’s foliage is a natural water conservator.

How to Grow Capers from Seed

What are capers and how are they used? Capers, unopened flower buds found on the caper bush, are the culinary darlings of many cuisines. Capers can be found in European foods and in those of Africa and India as well, where cultivation of growing capers is found. Growing a caper bush, however, is not an easy task.

Caring for caper plants requires a steady stream of strong sunlight and an arid climate. Growing caper plants have a hardiness range similar to olive trees (18 degrees F. or -8 degrees C.) and can also tolerate summer temperatures of over 105 degrees F. (41 degrees C.).

What are Capers Used For?

For growing a caper bush, seat cuttings in a loose, well-draining soil medium with a heat source at the base. Dipping the stem cutting in a bit of rooting hormone first is also beneficial.

Collect growing caper berry cuttings in February, March, or April using basal portions with six to ten buds.

Mature caper bushes can grow three feet high and spread four or five feet. They require dry heat and intense sunlight to flourish. They will be killed by temperatures below 20 degrees F. In the north, bring the plants inside during the winter or just grow them in pots in a greenhouse. Seeds are dormant and notoriously difficult to germinate. You can just try starting the seeds, but the following technique will give the best success (40-50%).

Soak the seeds in warm water for 24 hours. Put seeds in a wet towel, seal in a plastic bag and leave in the refrigerator for 6-8 weeks. Remove, soak again in warm water for 24 hours. Plant seeds 3/8 inch deep (lcm) in a mixture of potting soil/perlite/sand (50/25/25%). Use 4-6″ pots and put 4-5 seeds per pot. Seeds should germinate in 3-4 weeks. Grow until 3-5″ tall. Save the best plant; cut the rest with a scissors(don ‘t just pull them out). When transplanting, disturb the root as little as possible. For northem gardeners, when transplanting, protect plant from elements until it has taken (cover with plastic bag for the first 3-4 days, then cut top of the bag to admit some of the elements and leave a week, then remove entire bag) or use row covers. While not the easiest plant to grow, it is worth the effort to harvest and make your own capers.

Capers/Cappero. Mature caper bushes can grow three feet high and spread four or five feet. They are quite pretty and aromatic. They require dry heat and intense sunlight to flourish. Will be killed by temperatures below 20 degrees F. In the north, bring them inside in the winter and treat them like rosemary. Seeds are sometimes difficult to germinate; soak seeds a day, put in refridgerator in wet towel in plastic bag for 6 weeks, then plant in 5″ pots, 4 seeds/pot. Thin to strongest. When transplanting, disturb root as little as possible. May have flowers year 1, will have them year 2. 1 gram packet. To learn more about growing capers, click here.

Capers/Cappero. Mature caper bushes can grow three feet high and spread four or five feet. They are quite pretty and aromatic. They require dry heat and intense sunlight to flourish. Will be killed by temperatures below 20 degrees F. In the north, bring them inside in the winter and treat them like rosemary. Seeds are sometimes difficult to germinate; soak seeds a day, put in refridgerator in wet towel in plastic bag for 6 weeks, then plant in 5″ pots, 4 seeds/pot. Thin to strongest. When transplanting, disturb root as little as possible. May have flowers year 1, will have them year 2. 1 gram packet. To learn more about growing capers, click here.

Description