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growing huge cannabis plants outdoors

Growing huge cannabis plants outdoors

Intuitively, you might think that more nodes means more and larger buds, but this is far from the truth. Nodes with buds that are lower down on the plant away from the canopy will try to develop in flowering but will never become fully developed because they do not receive adequate light.

Pruning

Another tip for growing bigger buds involves regularly feeding compost tea to your soils. Compost teat helps develop healthy mycorrhizal relationships between the soil and mycelium. The more mycelium in the soil, the more nutrients the plant is going to take up, which will result in bigger buds.

Feeding

If you want to improve the yield of your plant, the best method is to prune away any plant life that isn’t receiving quality light. Trim away the buds and foliage that are under the canopy to “lollipop” your plant. This strategy will send all the energy into the canopy where the buds are receiving the most light, thus giving you bigger, denser nugs.

Some growers plant in containers on balconies or rooftops that are shielded from view, while some build heavy-gauge wire cages to keep thieves and animals at bay. Whatever you decide, think about how big you want your final plant to be—outdoor cannabis plants can grow to 10 feet tall or even more, depending on how much you let them go.

For most first-time gardeners, we recommend buying a quality potting soil that will provide your plants with enough nutrients to get them through most of their growth cycle without having to add many amendments. This pre-fertilized soil—often referred to as “super-soil”—that can grow cannabis plants from start to finish without any added nutrients if used correctly.

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Start off with fertilizers that are inexpensive and readily available. Some release nutrients quickly and are easily used by the plant, while others take weeks or months to release usable nutrients. If done correctly, you can mix in a few of these products with your soil amendments to provide enough nutrients for the entire life of your plants. Most of these items can be purchased cheaply at your local nursery.

Soil also varies in:

Clay soils

Once you have an understanding of the climate in your area, you’ll need to consider a few things before planting your weed.

Growing huge cannabis plants outdoors

It’s easy to get a decent harvest of outdoor buds as long as you take certain factors into account. The most important aspects are the amount of direct sunlight your plants will receive, the genetics of the plants you choose to grow and the care with which you harvest, dry and cure your finished branches. So be sure to find a good space to put your plants, choose great seeds or clones of known origin, and put an emphasis on your processing techniques when your plants are ripe.

Native soil is different everywhere, and the levels of fertility and drainage vary greatly from place to place. Your best bet is to send away some soil samples for testing so you’ll know exactly what you need to do to make it better. I believe in no-till gardening, meaning you just continue to place composted material on top of your soil without ever having to dig it up. Some growers recommend digging up the soil the first time you plant in it, but this is dependent on how rich your soil is in the first place.

Dear Dan,
I’ve done small grows the past two summers so I’m basically a beginner. I just want to be able to grow the best marijuana I can outdoors. I want it to be the bushiest plants with the best yields and highest THC levels. I hope to get serious in the marijuana business not just because I love smoking it, but I hope to grow marijuana for medical use to help other people. If there are any tips on what soil I should use, what I should put in the water, or anything special I can do to help grow more and bigger buds with higher THC, I would appreciate it. — Conner

As for the water, plants in good soil and full sun will need a lot of it. Use plain water often but also plan for feedings with a nutrient solution. I prefer organic formulations and always advise using less than the recommended amounts unless you’ve detected a deficiency. Drip systems work quite effectively on outdoor plants, delivering a near constant supply of water without over doing it and reducing the amount of water wasted to evaporation and overflow.