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growing medical cannabis in washington state

Growing medical cannabis in washington state

“We do not want to create an environment where adults are freely growing, producing and processing marijuana at home without any training or standardization,” said Jesse Jimenez of Prevent Coalition, an organization based in Vancouver, Washington, that works to prevent youth drug and alcohol use.

But it’s not clear that the state’s tax collections would be hurt by allowing people to grow marijuana at home.

A bipartisan group of legislators is proposing a bill that would let adults 21 and over grow cannabis plants at home for recreational use.

Washington legislators are considering a bill that would allow anyone age 21 and over to grow up to six marijuana plants at home. (Richard Vogel/AP)

That concern was echoed by substance-abuse prevention advocates, particularly because the bill says the state Liquor and Cannabis Board wouldn’t have authority to enforce the rules that would apply to home marijuana grows.

The measure passed out of the House Commerce and Gaming Committee on Friday. It would still need to pass both chambers of the Legislature — and not be vetoed by the governor — to become law.

Marijuana growing would also be banned in homes that provide day care services or host foster children.

Those entered in the state’s voluntary patient database may cultivate, in his or her domicile, up to 6 plants for the personal medical use and possess up to 8 ounces of useable marijuana produced from his or her plants. If the health care professional determines that the medical needs of a qualifying patient exceed the amounts provided, the health care professional may specify on the authorization that it is recommended that the patient be allowed to grow, in his or her domicile, up to 15 plants, yielding up to 16 ounces, of usable marijuana for the personal medical use of the patient. Qualified medical marijuana patients and designated providers may purchase immature plants, clones, or seeds from a licensed producer. In order to purchase plants or clones the patients and providers must hold a recognition card and be entered in the medical marijuana authorization database.

Those entered in the state’s voluntary patient database may possess: 48 ounces of marijuana-infused product in solid form; 3 ounces of useable marijuana; 216 ounces of marijuana-infused product in liquid form; or 21 grams of marijuana concentrates.

STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

No, but retail providers may also engage in the sale of medial cannabis.

If a qualifying patient has not been entered into the medical marijuana authorization database, he/she may grow, in his or her domicile, up to 4 plants for the personal medical use of the qualifying patient and 6 possess up to six ounces of useable marijuana in his or her domicile.

HOME CULTIVATION

Yes, designated provider is a person who has been designated in writing by a patient to serve as a designated provider. The caregiver must be 21 years of age or older. The provider must also possess either authorization from the qualifying patient’s health care professional or has been entered into an authorized database. The provider must only provide cannabis to the expressed patient.

If you grow outdoors, you cannot have more than one and a quarter year’s harvest on your property. If you grow indoors, you cannot have more than six months of your annual harvest on site.

Typically, quite a few more than a regular Washington business. Besides usual business permits, marijuana producers have to take in consideration how their activities affect the environment—you may need permits for air quality, water quality, solid waste handling, hazardous waste management and more. For instance, in some areas, you’re required to submit a State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) checklist so the state can see what kind of impact your business will have. In King, Kitsap, Snohomish and Pierce Counties, marijuana producers and processors are required to submit a pre-construction application with the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency—an application that comes with a $1,150 price tag.

At bare minimum, your shop needs to install a video surveillance camera with a resolution of no less than 640×470 pixels, and the system needs to be Internet Protocol (IP) compatible. All cameras need to be running 24 hours a day and be able to identify any individuals on the premises and any individuals approaching any of the building’s entrance points at no less than 20 feet from the premises. Copies of all footage on the premises must be kept for at least 45 days. Perimeter fencing of all outdoor grows must be in the line of sight of the cameras. In areas where marijuana is grown, the cameras need to be able to identify an individual at all times. Lights, hoods, and other grow production items cannot obscure the camera’s view.

Alarm System:

If you don’t use at least 50% of the square footage afforded to you, the WSLCB may knock you down a tier.

No government authority will be kind to you if you start growing cannabis without meeting all the requirements. Before flicking on your grow lights, the top regulatory requirement on your list needs to be obtaining a marijuana producer license. If you’ve completed the previous four steps, you should be in a good position.

You must keep extensive record of all inventories and upload records in the state’s database. The following needs to be kept completely up-to-date in the system:

What other permits does my marijuana business need?

Just note that when you buy a business, you don’t just get the good stuff. You also take on any debts or contracts, so be sure to do your research.

Yes. You can hold up to three of one kind of license (such as three producer licenses).