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how many marijuana plants can you grow in ohio

How many marijuana plants can you grow in ohio

“What we wanted to ensure is that when the program launches, we have product available in the market because if you don’t do that, then it is not really a meaningful alternative to the unregulated [illegal] market,” said Haren.

“I buy [medical marijuana edibles] in bulk because the local dispensary is about 40 minutes away so it’s kind of hard to me to get out there all the time,” said DeAngelis.

The issue in her first two years as a patient is that there aren’t many dispensaries near her home around Geneva-on-the-Lake, the price is high when she can get to a dispensary, and Ohio’s medical product supply is sometimes unpredictable.

“Ultimately, what happens in the Michigan market is there’s a lot more supply, demand is still high, so prices are comfortable for everyone,” said Korff.

Her hope is that even as a medical patient, she’d benefit from legalized marijuana in Ohio. In other states, that move often results in more dispensaries, more product selection, and lower prices.

Perhaps there is an explanation for why you were engaged in illegal cultivation and growing of marijuana. You may be a valid medical marijuana patient. Perhaps you have a substance abuse problem or are going through a difficult period in your life. Regardless what happened in your case, there are ways of mitigating these factors and potentially receiving a lesser sentence.

Illegal cultivation and growing of marijuana is a serious criminal offense in Ohio. Marijuana is classified as a Schedule I substance in Ohio, which means that it has a high risk of addiction and dependency in addition to having a recognized medical value. In some states, growing marijuana is legal and is permitted for medicinal use. In Ohio, the growing, cultivation, production or manufacturing of marijuana in any form is strictly illegal. It is considered both a state and federal offense. Penalties typically include extensive prison time and fines, which can vary based the amount of marijuana involved and whether the offense occurred near a school or minor.

If you are convicted for the illegal cultivation and growing of marijuana and the amount of marijuana is between five and 20 kilograms, then you will be charged with a third degree felony. This entails at least one and up to five years in prison in addition to fines up to $10,000.

Every day in Ohio, there are many individuals who are charged with illegal cultivation and growing of marijuana. Although each case is different, it is imperative that you obtain an experienced, knowledgeable and compassionate attorney who will fight for your legal rights and best interest. Cincinnati drug attorneys from LHA have successfully defended hundreds of individuals charged with illegal cultivation and growing of marijuana. Their knowledge, experience and compassion for your case will help you receive the justice you deserve.

Defending Illegal Cultivation and Growing of Marijuana

If you are convicted for the illegal cultivation and growing of marijuana and the amount of marijuana is greater than 20 kilograms, you will be charged with a second degree felony. This entails at least two and up to eight years in prison in addition to fines up to $15,000.

If you are convicted for the illegal cultivation and growing of marijuana and the amount of marijuana is less than 100 grams and the offense was near a school or minor, then you will be charged with a fourth degree misdemeanor. You will face up to 30 days in jail and fines up to $150.

If you are convicted for the illegal cultivation and growing of marijuana in Ohio, the penalties that you will face are dependent the amount of marijuana that was cultivated and whether the offense was near a school or minor.

Illegal Cultivation and Growing of Marijuana Penalties in Ohio

If you are convicted for the illegal cultivation and growing of marijuana and the amount of marijuana is between five and 20 kilograms and the offense occurred near a school or a minor, then you will be charged with a second degree felony. This entails at least two and up to eight years in prison in addition to fines up to $15,000.

If you are convicted for the illegal cultivation and growing of marijuana and the amount of marijuana is between 100 and 200 grams and the offense was near a school or minor, then you will be charged with a third degree misdemeanor. This entails up to 60 days in jail and a maximum fine of $150.

As mentioned, the severity of the penalty in each particular case largely depends on the amount of marijuana possessed or cultivated. The table below illustrates the consequences to marijuana cultivation offenses.

Ohio’s Cultivation of Marijuana Statute

Police may also find marijuana paraphernalia in your trash can on the street curb, where there is no reasonable expectation of privacy. After finding evidence of marijuana cultivation during a so-called trash pull, police may be able to secure a search warrant.

Probable Cause For Outdoor Cultivation Operations

Investigations and searches of marijuana grow houses are usually conducted through stakeouts of homes, similar dwellings suspected of containing marijuana, grow shops or light stores. Odor, noise, water leakage and resulting damage can lead to a marijuana drug bust in any of these places. Other law enforcement tactics for tracking down marijuana cultivation can include meter reading, unusual electricity consumption, police helicopter surveillance and the use of thermal imaging devices. Another means of discovering a marijuana grow house is through consent of the owner.