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how many seeds to grow one weed plant

If you use more than one or many cannabis seeds in a pot, the cannabis plants will begin to compete against each other for nutrients, so the smallest cannabis plants (which sometimes may be the best phenotypes.) will get wiped out by the bigger cannabis plants.

If you have ever wondered how many cannabis seeds per pot, look no further. One seed is all it takes to grow one plant so even if you see plants that look like as if they were bushes it is all just one seed. Regardless of the apparent size of the plant, all growers know that only one cannabis seeds per pot is required.

If you are growing from regular cannabis seeds they could also cross-pollinate resulting in buds with cannabis seeds in them. It sounds simple enough but if the buds have seeds inside them, the potency of the strain can be reduced up to 30%. Each cannabis seed is a plant and they need their own space to grow and thrive, as well as to produce bigger and better buds. Remember that more than one cannabis seed per pot is too many.

So you know how many cannabis seeds per pot, but you want to know what will happen anyway?

You might find our FAQ Submission How Many Marijuana Seeds To Grow A Plant? useful!

How many seeds to grow one weed plant

When growing indoors, growth duration is determined by how much space you have to work with. If you have a spacious basement or shed, you can let plants grow for months and get as big as you want before forcing them to flower. If space is tight, like in a grow tent or other small areas, you may only be able to let your plants get a few feet tall.

A big plant doesn’t necessarily mean big yields, as buds can be thin and wispy. A medium-sized plant with quality, dense nugs could yield more than a six-foot tree. Also, if growing multiple plants, they can grow over each other and shade one other out, reducing yields. Make sure to give plants plenty of space.

When growing indoors, you’re often limited by space—a plant can’t get as big in a grow tent as in a big, open basement. You’re also limited by how powerful your grow light is. For example, Leafly editor David Downs harvested 150g from one indoor plant with one 200W Black Dog LED light. The company said that light maxes out around a half-pound of buds, or 224g.

Growth duration

Using the above yield estimate of ¼ lb., or 112 grams, for one medium-to-large-sized indoor plant, if you smoke one gram a day, that one plant would last you 112 days, or just under four months! Two grams a day would last you just under two months, and half a gram a day—or an eighth a week—would last you eight months.

Be sure to prune your plants to remove dead leaves and buds, and branches that won’t turn into sizable buds. Clearing out plant matter will allow the quality buds to get more light.

Some regions get rain early in the fall, so you’ll want to grow plants that are ready to harvest by the beginning of October. In tropical climates, you can practically grow weed outdoors all year round.

Factors that determine a weed plant’s yield

Weed typically likes warm, temperate climates—think of Northern California’s Emerald Triangle region—but certain strains thrive in different temperatures. Traditionally, indicas like cold, dry climates and sativas like warm, humid climates.

Different soils have different nutrient levels and some nutrients can promote plant growth. You can also add nutrients to soil or water to help plants grow big and strong.

How many seeds to grow one weed plant

Don’t add more than one large seed to a hole. If you’re attempting a specific number of plants or just want a fuller pot, plant the large seeds closer together. You can snip or pull out those that are too close. Remember, seedlings need good airflow around them to avoid damping off.

Depending on the rate of germination and how fresh tiny seeds might be, plant two or three per hole. Some herbs and flowering ornamentals grow from tiny seeds. Often, all seeds will sprout, but this is not a problem with these plants. You may leave them all to grow together. If all seedlings that sprout are not top quality, snip them off at the soil line instead of pulling, leaving the best seedling in place.

The size and age of the seeds to be planted figure into the equation. So does the expected germination rate for each type of seed. To learn the expected germination rate for each type of seed, it is normally found in the information on the back of the seed packet, or you may search the online.

Number of Seeds Per Hole When Planting

Age of the seed is a factor too. We expect seeds to be fresh when packaged, but after that our only indication of their true age is the expiration date on the packaging. Some seeds continue to be viable past the date when they expire.

Some seeds need light to germinate. If this is the case with the seeds you’re planting, don’t allow extra seeds in the hole to block others from getting light. You may cover seeds with a light layer of perlite or coarse sand to let the light through.

When planting medium sized seeds that may be old, make the holes slightly bigger if you’re planting two or three. Don’t exceed three seeds per hole. If more than one germinates, snip off extras at the soil line also. This prevents disturbance of the seedling roots on the one you’ll continue growing out when thinning.

How Many Seeds Per Hole?

Some seeds have a thick outer shell. These sprout more readily if soaked overnight or nicked with a sharp tool. Plant these afterward, according to size.

Perhaps we have seeds left from last year’s plantings. These seeds will possibly still sprout. These are situations where we will increase the number of seeds per hole. Some gardeners always plant at least two to three seeds per hole, just in case.