How To Grow A Weed Seed Without Soil

Is soil an indispensable requirement for germinating seeds? No. Here are two methods to grow seeds without soil. You grow plants in soil, right? Not with hydroponics! Read here whether growing cannabis on water can also be a solution for you. Whether you call it weed, cannabis, pot, marijuana, or something else, the plant known as Cannabis sativa is actually easy to grow at home when you know what you need to do. Growing hydroponically will provide you with higher yields and a…

2 Indispensable Methods of Growing Seeds Without Soil

Is soil an indispensable requirement for germinating seeds? No. Here are two methods to grow seeds without soil.

Is soil an indispensable requirement for germinating seeds? No. Here are two methods to grow seeds without soil.

The conventional method of gardening and crop cultivation involve tilling of land, sowing seeds, weeding, and fertilizing. However, the advent of newer technology revolutionized the traditional methods of gardening and plant propagation. Earlier it was thought that soil is necessary for germination of seeds and growth of plants. With researches proving the fact that it was not the soil, but the nutrients and minerals in it which are responsible for the healthy growth of plants, a wide range of media and equipment were invented for growing seeds and plants without soil. One such example is hydroponic gardening, which uses water as a growing medium for plants. You may also buy soilless plant growing kits with gel-like substances that are specially developed for growing seeds and plants. However, growing seeds can be done at a very low cost, with some easily available materials. The following are some easy methods to grow seeds without using soil.

Method I

Materials Required: Seeds, paper towels, plastic trays, plastic film roll, and water.

Step I: Take two to three paper towels and spray some water till they get damp (not soggy). Place them on a shallow dish or tray. Spread some seeds on the paper towel. Small-sized seeds are preferred for this method. You may use seeds of chili, aubergine, tomato, etc.

Step II: Now cover the seeds with another set of two to three damp paper towels. Press them gently.

Step III: Cover the tray with a thin, transparent plastic film and place it on a windowsill (with access to sunlight) for two to three days. Make sure that the paper towels remain moist throughout this period. So spray small amounts of water, if the paper towels dry out completely.

Step IV: Avoid touching the seeds or opening the paper towels, till the sprouts appear. Once the sprouts grow, you can transplant them to pots. Make sure that you open the paper towels in a gentle manner, so that the sprouts can be removed intact. This is very important, if you intend to transplant them.

Treating the seeds with a diluted bleach solution may prove useful in preventing mold formation in the germination bags. In that case, dip the seeds in the solution for 10 to 15 seconds, before use. The time required for sprouting may not be uniform in all cases. This method is ideal for small seeds. However, bigger seeds can also be grown with this method. In case of a mango seed, remove the tough outer covering, before wrapping it in damp paper towels. It may take around three weeks for the seed to germinate.

Method II

Materials Required: Bean seeds, a wide-mouthed glass jar, cheesecloth and rubber bands/mesh lid or sprouting lid, and water.

Step I: Put the seeds in the jar and add water. The level of water must be around an inch above the level of the seeds. Place the jar in a warm, dark place and let the seeds soak overnight. You may either use a mesh lid or cover the jar with a cheesecloth and secure it with rubber bands.

Step II: The next morning, drain the water in the jar and rinse the seeds. Once done, drain again and keep the jar upside down for some time, so that the water is removed completely. You have to repeat the process every twelve hours, to prevent the seeds getting slimy. Once the water is drained, keep the jar back in a dark, warm place.

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Step III: Sprouts will develop within two to three days, if you are using bean seeds. The time taken for sprouting may vary with factors like, temperature, type of seeds, etc. Once the sprouts appear, you can shift the jar to the windowsill with indirect sunlight. This will help faster growth of leaves. As the sprouts grow, you can remove them from the jar and plant in soil.

In short, soil is not necessary for growing seeds at home. However, these methods are not viable, if you opt for large-scale seed germination. You may also go for other media like, sponge, rock wool, and specialized gels (as used in tissue culture), for growing seeds without soil. The methods mentioned above are very easy and less messy. Even kids will enjoy such fun experiments.

Hydroponics: Growing Cannabis Without Soil

If you’re thinking about growing cannabis plants, chances are you’ll think about pots filled with soil. However, in hydroponics, weed is grown in water instead of soil. This technique is also known as hydroculture or RDWC (Recirculating Deep Water Culture), but hydroponics is the most usual term. This method is not as complicated as many people think. Actually, growing gets easier with this technique, as plants will grow faster because they can absorb more nutrients. Hydroponics is suited for just about any plant, but it works especially well with vegetables and cannabis. This blog tells you just what hydroponics can do for you as a cannabis grower.

How Does Hydroponics Work For Cannabis Growers?

To be fair, hydroponics sounds like a pretty impressive technique. The word itself comes from the Greek concepts of ‘hydros’ and ‘ponos’ (‘water-work’; the ancient Greeks worshiped Hydros as an old god of water, and Ponos as the god of hard work). Ironically though, hydroponics done right isn’t hard work at all. Of course, it’s a matter of preference in the end, but most growers agree that hydro grows are easy once you get you get the hang of it.

Hydroponics is on the rise; mostly because it gives growers greater control over how their plants develop. Instead of growing your weed plants in soil, you grow them directly in water containing all necessary nutrients. That comes with some distinct advantages, making this technique an interesting option for advanced and amateur growers alike.

Liquid Lunch: Nutrients Straight From The Water

In hydroponics, plant roots are suspended straight in the water rather than in soil. That makes water the substrate or grow medium. Substrate is just a fancy term for ‘bottom layer’ (‘sub’ + ‘stratum’). Such layers can be anything from sand or rockwool to coco fibre, gravel, or clay pellets. In cannabis hydroponics, water is the grow medium; even if there’s a layer of clay pellets in the top section of a (floating) pot for stability. Nutrients are dissolved into the water and delivered straight to the roots. Any water that is not absorbed is recycled by the system for future use. Roots of plants grown in hydroponics tend to be longer and paler than their soil-grown counterparts, with fewer side branches. This is caused by the low oxygen content of water compared to soil.

Basically, any plant can be grown using hydroponics. Cannabis thrives on it, but these days, you’ll find entire farms growing lettuce and leeks on water alone. Fun fact: the increasing popularity of growing cannabis at home has been one of the driving forces behind the development of new hydroponics systems used in regular agriculture!

Cannabis Hydroponics Basics

The diagram below shows the basic components of a simple hydroponics setup for cannabis growers.

1: Substrate; in this case, water containing nutrients. Some systems have plants suspended directly in water, while other favour pots with a top layer of clay pellets for extra support;

2: Cover preventing evaporation and contamination of the substrate. This is usually a floating lid with holes providing a snug fit for suspended plants;

3: Aeration or oxygenation; usually in the from of an exhaust unit blowing air bubbles into the water;

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4: Air pump. Many hydro setups feature a separate water pump with a filter to keep the water clean while circulating.

Different Cannabis Hydroponics Systems

The one thing all hydroponics systems have in common is the lack of soil needed to grow your cannabis plants. Hydroponics gets your cannabis plants everything they need, except light: nutrients, oxygen, and water. This can be done in several ways. Below, you’ll find a summary of the most common hydroponics systems.

(R)DWC: (Recirculating) Deep Water Culture.

(R)DWC: (Recirculating) Deep Water Culture

RDWC is the easiest system to manage, making it a great option for beginners. You put your germinated plants into individual containers, which you then place into a water container. All you add is some hydro pellets to give the roots some added grip. An air pump ensures a constant air supply into the water. Nutrients are added to the water, which the plants can then absorb through their roots. That means roots are constantly exposed to water throughout the growth cycle. The R in RDWC stands for Recirculating, because the water is constantly pumped around the system in a closed loop.

RDWC System without plants.

NFT System

This is a slightly more complex system to use. NFT stands for Nutrient Film Technique. Here, plants grow with their roots in a wide tube, usually made of PVC. The oxygen-rich water carrying nutrients is pumped from the reservoir to the tubes and back. Tubes should be installed at an angle to ensure ample water flow back into the reservoir. The ‘Film’ in NFT represents the ideal situation in which just a thin filmy layer of water and nutrients flows over and along the roots.

This system is great at providing nutrients to your plants. If set up efficiently, it also saves water and power. One potential problem is clogged tubing due to roots blocking the flow. That gives bacteria a chance to grow, which of course will negatively impact your plants. Stay sharp while trying NFT!

Ebb And Flow System

In an ebb and flow setup, the roots are not constantly submerged. A pump regularly fills the container with oxygenated and nutrient-rich water. When the container is full, the pump stops working, allowing the water to flow back into the reservoir. It’s a bit like running your own little mangrove at home. You set the ebb and flow intervals according to what your plants need.

How about running your personal mangrove at home?

Drip System

Drip irrigation is a popular technique among professional growers all across the agri- and horticulture sectors, but amateur homegrowers will find it very convenient, too. You feed and water your plants using a drip system. Every individual plant gets its own drip nozzle. That allows for very accurate distribution of nutrients, ensuring that every plant gets an equal share. Any liquid not absorbed by the plants flows back into the reservoir for future use.

The Benefits Of Cannabis Hydroponics

Compared to growing in soil, hydroponics can have many benefits.

  • You can target your nutrition more accurately, because you don’t depend on what happens to be present in the soil. That allows you to set the perfect nutrient mix without losing valuable ingredients along the way;
  • Save yourself work: no need to remove weeds, while the system makes sure your plants are fed and watered. Just keep an eye on the water level in your reservoir. Two refill a week will usually do the job. As you can see, hydroponics is perfect for lazy relaxed growers;
  • Your plants will absorb the exact amounts of water and nutrients they need; no more and no less. The system simply recycles any excess water, making it a very efficient system too. Obviously, as a plant enthusiast, you care about the environment: life’s good when you can save the world by growing sustainable weed;
  • Pest control: hydroponics environments are cleaner than regular soil. That limits the options for pests and bugs – one thing less to worry about;
  • Better yields: plants grow better in hydroponics. For cannabis, that means better yields than for weed grown in soil, all other factors being equal;
  • Rapid growth: using a hydroponics setup could reduce the growth phase of your plants by three weeks. Roughly speaking, that could mean two extra harvests every year;
  • Not dependent on the weather: hot, dry summer? Freezing cold winter? It’s all the same for hydroponics, because all the plants get exactly what they need, no matter the weather. You don’t even have to keep track of the seasons – if you’re growing indoors, that is.

Drawbacks Of Hydroponics

Using hydroponics for cannabis does come with a few minor drawbacks, though. Firstly, you’ll need to spend more on equipment before you can get your system up and running. Then again, working with the right system eventually pays off in terms of saving on water and electricity.

The second and most important drawback is the tight margin for error that hydro grows offer. Soil has considerable buffer capacity: any surplus of nutrients or lack of oxygen can be compensated in part by the soil and the micro-organisms it contains. Hydroponics barely has any buffer capacity in this sense. Overdosing on nutrients or – worse – power outages will almost certainly damage your plants. That means hydroponics calls for some more vigilance from you as a grower. As long as you know what you’re getting into, though, that should not be a problem.

Outdoor Cannabis Grows Using Hydroponics

Most growers using hydroponics for their cannabis choose to do so indoors. That makes sense from the perspective of optimal control over equipment, lighting, and a bunch of other factors. Such control is slightly trickier to achieve with outdoor grows, but theoretically, hydroponics works perfectly well out in the sunshine. In fact, there are serious plans for using hydroponics as a technique for tackling global hunger issues. Of course, outdoor hydroponics calls for some extra attention to typical open-air factors like the weather, disease, and fungi, but it is certainly an option. A little greenhouse can be a big help, but you don’t strictly need one. What’s more, technology keeps improving all the time, so who knows? You could be running your own water theme park in your back garden come next grow season. At any rate, though, it’s good to know we’ll solve the world’s food problems by the efforts of weed growers such as yourself!

Getting To Grips With Hydroponics

As you’ve seen, cannabis hydroponics opens the door to carefree growing and enjoying better harvests from your weed plants. So, do you feel like starting up your own hydro grow? Give yourself the best possible start with our world-famous cannabis seeds!

How to Grow Marijuana Hydroponically

This article was co-authored by Lauren Kurtz. Lauren Kurtz is a Naturalist and Horticultural Specialist. Lauren has worked for Aurora, Colorado managing the Water-Wise Garden at Aurora Municipal Center for the Water Conservation Department. She earned a BA in Environmental and Sustainability Studies from Western Michigan University in 2014.

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Whether you call it weed, cannabis, pot, marijuana, or something else, the plant known as Cannabis sativa is actually easy to grow at home when you know what you need to do. Growing hydroponically will provide you with higher yields and a shorter grow time compared to growing in soil, but it can often be difficult for the beginning grower to get started with hydroponics. However, most people think of plants growing in water when they think “hydroponics” but actually your plants will get many of the benefits of hydroponics as long as they’re getting their nutrients directly in their water supply. However because of superior air to water ratio in hydroponics, it remains the industry standard. This tutorial will show you step-by-step how to grow your marijuana in 3-4 months using the (arguably) easiest hydroponic method: hand-watering in a soil-less medium.

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