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how to grow marijuana in my closet

How to grow marijuana in my closet

Whether you use it for medicinal purposes or recreationally, you might be thinking about giving cultivating marijuana on your own a shot.

3 Great Reasons to Grow Your Own Cannabis

Whatever the case may be, if you’re looking to grow weed covertly, there’s a simple way that you can stay under the radar. How? By growing it in a closet! That’s right, a closet.

2. Stealth operations.

While using a closet as a weed “farm” (for lack of a better word) might sound like a difficult feat and even downright impossible, believe it or not, it’s actually doable; in fact, lots of people have successfully grown cannabis in closets.

Remember, a common mistake newbie growers make is to overwater plants.

These come in different shapes and sizes and are a great way to get rid of odor in an indoor weed grow. Also known as “carbon scrubbers” for their ability to get contaminants out of the air, these employ activated and highly ionized carbon to attract particulates responsible for carrying odor, such as dust, hair, mold spores, and volatile organic compounds, and traps them in a filter.

What type of container you use will depend on the grow medium, the system, and the size of your plants.

Equip yourself with these cheap and easy-to-use tools to take measurements in your indoor cannabis setup:

Watering and nutrients

Terra cotta pots offer a unique set of benefits to growers in hot climates.

Check out our buying guide on indoor lights for more info.

Standard plastic containers are a popular option for growers operating on a budget. These pots are inexpensive and provide the essentials for your plants.

Odor absorbing gels may help

Because the amount of light a plant receives is so important, you’ll need to make your indoor grow space light-tight. Light leaks during dark periods will confuse your plants and can cause them to produce male flowers or revert to a different stage.

If your space is too humid, you may need to invest in a dehumidifier—also known as “dehueys.” However, keep in mind that while dehueys will reduce humidity, they typically increase temperature—you may need more fans or an AC when adding a dehumidifier.