Posted on

how to prevent weeds from growing in landscaping

How to prevent weeds from growing in landscaping

Your landscaping adds a lot of beauty to your property and you likely appreciate them for their aesthetic appeal. That is until you start seeing weeds creep in. Weeds are an eyesore that can really detract from the overall look of your landscape beds.

How to Stop Weeds from Growing in Mulch

So let’s talk about how to prevent weeds in flower beds so that you can get back to enjoying their beauty without having to commit your weekend to pull weeds.

Enhancing the Health of Your Flower Beds

If you’re like a lot of homeowners, you might feel frustrated by the uncertainty of what to do about weeds in your landscaping.

How to prevent weeds from growing in landscaping

We often find weed seeds in old or contaminated mulch. Seeds can also get distributed by birds or wind into new beds.

As experienced gardeners know, fighting weeds is a never-ending battle. They seem to pop up no matter what you do. But there are proven strategies for preventing them, and mulch is one of the best tools available. Working with a professional for your landscaping needs, including mulch application, is the best way to make sure your weed control program works.

How Can I Prevent Weeds in My Mulch?

We all know how tenacious weeds can be. They thrive on the very same things your garden does: sunlight, water, and nutrients in the soil. Weeds take pretty much any opportunity to grow and aren’t picky about where they take root. As plant-based mulch decomposes, it provides an attractive, nutrient-rich environment for weeds to take root.

If weeds start popping up in mulch, we want to tackle them before they can seed and spread. If you’re pulling weeds by hand, make sure you get the whole weed, including the root. Applying a pre-emergent herbicide is also an option. One approach is a commercial weed-killer like Roundup, which contains the chemical glyphosate. Some gardeners prefer a more natural approach, using a mixture of vinegar, salt, and dish soap to kill weeds as they grow.

How Can I Kill Weeds in Mulch?

Applying mulch every spring makes sense on several levels. It helps enrich the soil and helps retain moisture during the dry summer months. But the main reason most of us mulch is weed control. We faithfully lay down a couple of inches of mulch and cross our fingers that we’ve won the battle. But most of us aren’t so lucky: weeds almost always find a way to pop up, even in the most beautifully mulched landscaping. Why are weeds so hard to tame, and what can you do to stop them? Here are a few tips:

Check the label to determine if it is safe for use around the kinds of landscape plants you have and effective against the weeds normally present.

Tips on how to keep weeds out of the garden, add the right amount of mulch over weeds, and 6 mistakes to avoid to keep your garden weed-free.

Raindrip Inc.
2250 Agate Ct.
Simi Valley, CA 93065
www.raindrip.com
877/237-3747
Request the free “Drip Watering Made Easy” guide.

How to Mulch Over Weeds

Frequent, light watering causes shallow roots and helps annual bluegrass, crabgrass, chickweed, sedges and other weed seeds germinate. If you water too little, the lawn suffers while spotted spurge, Bermuda grass, quackgrass and other weeds adapted to drier soil thrive. Instead, provide your lawn with infrequent, deep soakings. Lawns need about 1 inch of water per week. Set an empty tuna can on the lawn to determine when you have applied 1 inch of water.

A single redroot pigweed is able to produce up to 30,000 seeds in a season. And those seeds can remain alive in the soil for 70 years waiting to sprout and overrun your perennial border at any time.

Share this story

Preemergence herbicides, such as those containing oryzalin or trifluralin (look on the label for these chemicals), or nontoxic corn gluten meal, kill weeds just as they germinate and will not eradicate established weeds. For a preemergence herbicide to be effective, you must apply it to soil cleared of visible weeds; also, you have to water most of these herbicides into the soil.

You can also use landscape fabrics to control weeds under decks and in pathways (spread over the excavated soil base before you add gravel or sand). A 3×50-ft. roll of landscape fabric, such as the Typar shown below, costs about $10. The fabric is also available in 36-in. die-cut circles (about $3 each) for installing at the base of trees.