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how to separate male and female weed seeds

How to separate male and female weed seeds

Some cultivators grow their plants to shorter or taller heights during the vegetative phase before putting them into the flowering phase, depending on personal preference.

To induce flowering, the timers are scaled back to an even 12 hours of light to 12 hours of darkness. This 12:12 flowering light cycle mimics the shortening days of late summer and early fall, when many plants or trees bloom and bear fruit or flowers.

Male cannabis plant

Getting Through the Vegetative Phase

Now that you know When to Separate Male and Female Cannabis Plants make sure you get it right when you’re growing weed! It can make all the difference in the world!

If growing only female plants is the ultimate goal, there’s much to be said for the merits of feminized seed. This type of seed comes from specialized breeding practices that only utilize female plants, so this seed lacks the male chromosomes to produce male plants. When the plants begin to reveal their sex, they will all be female.

Moving Into The Flowering Phase

Female Cannabis Plant. Indica flowering marijuana.

Growing cannabis at home is a very rewarding practice, and those who do it well can take pride in their harvest—as well as save a lot of money by producing their own. If you have the time and space, consider taking the plunge. Most likely, you’ll be glad you did and probably wonder why you didn’t do it sooner.

How to separate male and female weed seeds

5 Easy Ways to Grow Marijuana Hydroponically – wikiHow

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If you’re growing marijuana and want to maximize the buds you get, you need to know how to identify female and male pot plants. Almost all growers prefer female weed plants because only females produce the buds with THC content for recreational or medicinal purposes. Male weed plants have low potency compared to female plants, and they’re kept to mostly produce seeds. We’ll teach you how to spot the early signs of male vs. female cannabis plants so you can prevent males from pollinating the female plants (and ruining your crop). Most importantly, we’ll show you how to tell which plants will give you buds!

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If you’re growing marijuana plants, it’s important to be able to tell male and female plants apart, since only the females produce the buds that contain high concentrations of THC. To identify male and female marijuana plants, make sure they’ve been growing for at least 6 weeks, since both types of plant look the same in their early stages. Then, look for male plants to have thicker stalks and fewer leaves than their female counterparts. You can also tell if a plant is male by checking for little flowers or bulbs at the joints of the stalk and branches. By contrast, you’ll see small, translucent hairs on the same areas of a female plant. Once you’ve identified that a plant is male, remove it from your growing area to prevent it from pollinating the female plants, which will result in your THC harvest being reduced. For tips on what to do with plants that have both male and female organs, read on!

About This Article

After the seeds have sprouted and the plants have had a chance to grow, it will be time to find out which ones you’ll be keeping to flower out and which ones you will be chopping down to avoid seeded buds.

While there are actually many complex forms of morphology, for the sake of keeping it simple, we’re only going to cover three of the most common ones.

Now, with an understanding of the various sexual organs within cannabis plants, let’s get to the fun part – separating your lady friends from their male counterparts.

First, let’s take one step back to fully grasp why we need to separate cannabis plants by male and female in the first place. This is commonly referred to as the plant reproductive morphology, which is simply the study of the physical form and structure of a plant’s sexual reproduction parts.

Dioecious:

Now, with a dioecious plant, you will find that the plant either produces all male parts or all female parts. This means that no single plant can reproduce on its own. The female actually needs its male counterpart to continue producing seed for the following year. And, you guessed it, this is the category cannabis falls into and why you must separate your males from females. If you fail to separate them all, you will likely find that the male plants pollinated your females. Therefore, leaving you with a handful of buds chalked full of seeds.

When it comes to growing cannabis, it truly is essential that you learn the difference between male and female cannabis plants. By learning this simple technique, you can easily decide what you want to pollinate and what you don’t.

This is a type of plant that forms both male and female parts on the same plant. Therefore, this plant will be able to reproduce on its own. However, in cannabis plants, you can discover a “hermied” plant by banana looking shoots, which form on the flowers. While this can be the genetics of the cannabis strain, it may also be an indication of the plant getting too stressed out. When a plant gets too stressed and fears it will die, it may begin to form male reproductive parts. This is to ensure that seeds can drop for its survival (keep reading for more info on detecting “hermied” cannabis plants).

Understanding Plant Reproductive Morphology

For this type of plant, it will form both male and female reproductive parts. However, they will not be on the same flower as they are with hermaphrodite plants. Within monoecious plants, you will find one flower has female parts, while another has male parts. In cannabis, this is very uncommon to find. Actually, it’s only been reported a few times in history and something that we’ve never personally seen. If this were to happen, you would find one stalk with definitive male characteristics and other branches of the same plant with definitive female characteristics.

Usually, when starting from seed, you will need to wait about four to six weeks before the male and female parts will be formed well enough for you to see the difference.