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is growing weed legal in nj

There is a question of safety.

Medical patients could grow up to 10 plants. Ken Wolski, executive director of the Coalition for Medical Marijuana, has been pushing for this to open up access to more than 100,000 patients who only have 14 alternative treatment centers to choose from.

Gopal says it would be up to local municipalities whether or not to allow dispensaries or growers.

“Sixty seven percent of New Jerseyans voted yes for adult use cannabis. You know, they were voting for, you know, safe, and regulated cannabis, not the Wild West,” he said.

“We have some of the most expensive medical marijuana in the country,” Wolski said. “So many patients are just, you know, have already been impoverished by their illnesses that they simply cannot afford this medicine.”

“It’s going to take at least six months to make our initial rules and regulations, and then only at that point, will they start soliciting adult use licenses. And then it will take another 90 days for those licenses to get considered. And only then can they start the process of opening up,” McQueeny said.

Police can no longer arrest people for possessing marijuana but there is no legal way to buy it right now. Marijuana industry expert Mike McQueeny says this could be a quicker way to access legal weed. Setting up dispensaries will take longer.

TRENTON, N.J. (CBSNewYork) – Could New Jersey residents soon be allowed to legally grow marijuana at home?

As CBS2’s Meg Baker reports, St. Sen. Vin Gopal sponsored a bill to allow anyone 21 and older to grow up to six marijuana plants at home.

There is no other industry where there is an appropriate parallel. New Jersey residents can grow their own tobacco, brew their own beer and bottle their own wine at home. But marijuana? Forget about it. The Star-Ledger’s editorial board recently referred to this legal disparity as “off-the-charts idiotic.”

Who stands to benefit from keeping homegrown cannabis illegal in New Jersey? Although there are no such allegations being made in the Garden State, there have been reports of marijuana businesses advocating for a ban on homegrown cannabis to protect their own interests in other states, from New York to Michigan.

But here’s the problem: although it is legal in New Jersey for any adult to buy cannabis, it’s still not legal for anyone to grow a single plant. If a police officer in New Jersey catches anyone growing cannabis, that person can go to prison for five years and face a $25,000 fine — for growing one plant. That is an untenable situation that lacks any legal logic, and it stinks like Mark Sanchez’s mask after the butt fumble.

It could take months for such operations to open their doors after trying to find a location, building out and waiting for cannabis plants to grow.

“We anticipate dynamic growth and development in the industry as the new entities become operational and the great potential of New Jersey’s adult-use market becomes a reality,” New Jersey Cannabis Trade Association President Shaya Brodchandel said in a statement. “Together, we have an exciting road ahead and look forward to working with these new licensees — and those to come — to continue building this growing industry.”

Ownership changes have become commonplace in the cannabis industry, especially in states with medical marijuana programs where weed has since been legalized.

By the state’s own estimates, there should be 26 medical marijuana cultivators and 61 dispensaries to handle that number of patients, Brown said. Instead, the state has just 23 active dispensaries selling cannabis grown by only 10 operators.

Since medical marijuana cultivators and dispensaries already have the products, officials believe it will be faster for them to simply “flip a switch” and open sales to anyone over 21 than for the state to license new recreational-only operations.

TRENTON – The number of legal cannabis growers in the state will more than double after regulators on Friday issued new licenses designed to ease crippling supply issues for medical marijuana patients and push the state closer to legal weed sales for all adults.

The terms of the licenses issued Friday emphasized the importance of ensuring patients’ needs are met before worrying about legal weed. License holders must wait at least one year before applying for a permit to transition into recreational sales and cannot change ownership for two years.

The process was halted for over a year due to a lawsuit by applicants whose applications were rejected due to a file format issue.

The CRC did not release information about the licensees except for the region of the state in which they intended to operate.