MAPS And Friends Sue DEA

MAPS And Friends Sue DEA

Ponder for a moment: what do you think would happen if we were to permit our scientific community to study weed as medicine, they would either turn up evidence showing that it’s benign (at worst) or a miracle drug (at best)– then what?!


Back in the dark ages, when the feds first began funding marijuana cultivation for research purposes deep inside a protected facility housed at the University of Mississippi in 1968, the federal government was extremely careful not to let any fully legal pot stash fall into the wrong hands. And by “wrong hands,” we don’t mean a doomed and motley group of bong hitting enthusiasts involved in a Harold and Kumar style Stoner comedy adventure seeking to break into America’s ultimate high tech grow room. We mean legitimate, scientific researchers – hoping to conduct FDA approved studies of cannabis is for the potential benefit of mankind.

Ponder for a moment: what do you think would happen if we were to permit our scientificcommunity to study weed as medicine, they would either turn up evidence showing that it’s benign (at worst) or a miracle drug (at best)– then what?!

That’s why the political mouthpieces of big pharmaceutical have been aggressively blocking almost all such studies by utilizing their monopoly over federally legal marijuana in an attempt to contain any research that doesn’t fit their desired narrative of ‘pot as a harmful and addictive,’ a vicious drug with no accepted medical value, which most know is BS. It’s no wonder that so many scientists, botanists and would be cannabis researchers have been collaborating to push for a second, federally approved marijuana production facility.

Most recently, on May 11, 2012, the United States Court of Appeals for the first circuit in Boston, heard oral arguments in a lawsuit against the DEA for denying Dr. Lyle Craker a license to grow different marijuana strains for privately funded medical research. His lawsuit follows more than a decade of requests and appeals by Dr. Craker a professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst Department of Plant, soil and insect sciences, who first applied in June 2001 for a DEA license to start the proposed facility under contract to the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic studies or MAPS, as they are sometimes known. Maps is a nonprofit research and educational organization whose sole mission includes developing marijuana into an FDA approved prescription medicine.

As recent as 2007, one of the DEA’s more prominent administrative law judges made the astounding recommendation granting Dr. Craker a license to fire up a second facility, noting that it would be in the public interest – stubborn, dumb, or just greedy – rather than coming to terms with the nonbinding decision, our dark hearted DEA admins instead began to drag their a$$ for another four years before finally shooting down the reasonable application. It was at this point that Dr. Craker and his cohorts at MAPS and the ACLU were finally free to sue the DEA and federal court.

After Dr. Craker’s recent court date with the DEA, Rick Doblin, the founder and Executive Director of MAPS, showed signs of optimism while exiting the courtroom. “The judges seemed dubious about the DEA’s interpretation of US single convention treaty obligation and the DEA’s attempt to claim that the national Institute on drug abuse’s monopoly on marijuana for legal research meets the required standard of adequate supply produced under adequately competitive conditions,” Doblin reported. “If we lose this case, we clearly demonstrated federal obstruction of research.