Mexican Competitiveness Institute Reports On … “If Our Neighbors Legalize”

Mexican Competitiveness Institute Reports On ... "If Our Neighbors Legalize"

“That choice will lead to a loss of $1.425 billion to the cartels if Colorado legalizes, $1.372 billion if Washington approves the ballot measure, and $1.839 billion if Oregon votes yes, the study says.”

A recent study publicized (10.31.2012) by the highly esteemed Mexican think tank, the Mexican Competitiveness Institute, believes that – should the current proposals to legalize the recreational use of weed in Washington, Colorado and Oregon be passed… it might potentially lead to a dramatic decline in the Mexican drug cartels’ profits from the north bound pot traffic by as much as 30 percent.

Pro drug war skeptics… doubt some of the study’s more Pro marijuana legalizations expectations, noting that the legalization of recreational marijuana consumption might also offer new growth opportunities for the ever crafty drug cartels to carry on their operations within the U.S. boarders. Offsetting any potential profit lost from their international weed smuggling operations.

It calculates the hypothetical, post-legalization price of marijuana produced in Oregon, Washington and Colorado and sold within those states and smuggled to other states. It then assumes that purchasers around the U.S. will choose domestic marijuana when it is sold cheaper than the current price of Mexican marijuana. That choice will lead to a loss of $1.425 billion to the cartels if Colorado legalizes, $1.372 billion if Washington approves the ballot measure, and $1.839 billion if Oregon votes yes, the study says.

As Americans wait with baited breath the decision on Nov. 6, which would permit adults to possess small sacks of their favorite strain of pot – under the watchful eye of the states – with full regulation and proper taxation, one can only hope. Currently polls show two close races in Washington and Colorado, with Washington’s I-502 having the best chance of gaining the voters blessings. Oregon’s attempt looks to be in the biggest trouble, as it would impose the fewest regulations on its pot smoking populace.

The study from south of the boarder, “If Our Neighbors Legalize,” makes the assumption that marijuana legalization in any state would greatly increase the amount pot produced at a relatively reduced cost and thereby create its own dark little vortex of illicit pot flowing to neighboring states.

The study — which was based on previous reports by U.S. authorities believes that currently the Mexican drug cartels rake in nearly $6 billion a year from their activities.