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purple weeds growing in my yard

Purple weeds growing in my yard

Getting rid of deadnettle weeds is much more challenging than dealing with many other annual weeds because they tend to go to seed before mowing season even begins. Couple that with the thousands of seeds each plant can release persisting in the soil for years, and you’ve got one durable weed on your hands. One or two purple deadnettle weeds popping up in the lawn can easily be plucked by hand and disposed of as soon as they appear, but a larger population requires a more complicated solution.

Purple deadnettle (Lamium purpureum) is a common annual weed that belongs to the mint family, which explains why it’s such a pest. Like other mints, purple deadnettle is an aggressive grower that spreads like wildfire anywhere it can get a foothold. You’ll recognize it and its cousin, henbit, by their distinctive square stems that hold up an umbrella of tiny flowers and small pointed leaves reaching up to an inch long.

You don’t have to be a die-hard gardener to keep a great looking community of plans around your house. Many homeowners find a manicured and weed-free lawn to be just as pretty as any rose garden. When you’re maintaining a sea of grass, every plant that isn’t yours must be eradicated. Control of deadnettle is just one such task that turf keepers face year after year. It sounds tricky, but don’t fear! We’ve got some deadnettle weed management pointers to help you with this formidable foe.

What is Purple Deadnettle?

Growing a thick, healthy lawn is the first line of defense against these mint cousins, since the grass will easily out compete the weeds for nutrients and growing space. Consider planting a grass more compatible with the growing conditions if you’ve got a spot in the yard that’s plagued with these plants. Sometimes, the thick shade a tree casts or a low spot that catches water can make it difficult for the grass that lives on the rest of your flat, sunny lawn to grow – this is when you need a special grass blend. Check with your local nursery for grass seed better suited to these rough conditions.

Post-emergence herbicides that contain metsulfuron or trifloxysulfuron-sodium can be used against purple deadnettle erupting in Bermuda grass or zoysia grass, but pre-emergence herbicides are much safer for other grasses. Be sure to apply pre-emergence herbicides in the late fall or early winter, before the purple deadnettle starts to germinate.

Deadnettle Control

Control: Prevent poison ivy with a deep layer of mulch. If the weed starts to grow in your yard, spot-treat it with an herbicide or wrap your hand in a plastic bag, pull the plant up, roots and all, and carefully invert the plastic bag around the plant, seal, and throw away.

Test Garden Tip: This plant is sometimes grown as an ornamental in shade gardens.

Where It Grows: Sunny landscape and garden areas

Type: Broadleaf annual

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Appearance: Identify this weed groundcover by its fleshy, dark green leaves and small yellow flowers at the ends of the stems.

Appearance: Velvetleaf gets its name because of its large, velvety heart-shape leaves up to 10 inches across. The weed blooms with yellow flowers in summer.

Control: Prevent pokeweed with a deep layer of mulch. Once the plant grows, hand-pull or spot-treat it with an herbicide.

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Control: Mulch the garden to prevent weeds or use a preemergence herbicide in spring. Pull weeds by hand or spot-treat with a nonselective postemergence herbicide.

Appearance: Knotweed is an invasive groundcover with blue-green leaves sparsely appearing on long stems.

Purple weeds growing in my yard

Commonly found in lawns that are cut too short, Creeping Charlie is probably the hardest weed to get rid of because even a small piece left behind can regrow and make a new plant.

You can identify this groundcover weed by its scalloped leaves and clusters of purple flowers in late spring.

Creeping Charlie

The leaves can vary but usually are heart shaped, and the flowers range from white to blue to purple. And the flowers are shaped like pansies.

When it comes to controlling weeds in your lawn, knowing what you are trying to kill is more than half the battle. Once you know the weed you can then choose from many options to control them, sometimes if you get it early enough it won’t cost an arm and a leg to get rid of them.

Oxalis

One of the easiest ways to tell clover from similar looking weeds like Oxalis is by looking for a whitish crescent in the center of the leaves.